WILLS & PROBATE
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Basic Information Regarding Wills

What a Valid Will Should Include

Information Regarding Estate Planning:

Frequently Asked Questions About Getting Started

Will Questionnaire

Power of Attorney 

A Power of Attorney is a written instrument that gives someone the authority to act on your behalf.  All powers of attorney cease upon death. 

Durable Powers of Attorney usually grant the broadest powers of all and they remain in effect if you become incapacitated.  There are usually three parts to a Durable Power of Attorney:

A statement of intent to create a Durable Power of Attorney;
the appointment of the attorney-in-fact or representative;
and a statement of the attorney-in-fact's powers.

A Power of Attorney can be revoked at any time for any reason, depending on whether or not it is durable and as long as you are still competent.

VIEW SAMPLE POWER OF ATTORNEY

Directive to Physicians

A Directive to Physicians, or Living Will, prepares you for any unexpected incapacitation.  It allows you to decide in advance what medical treatment you want to receive if you become physically or mentally unable to communicate your wishes.  

Most people can't stand the idea of lying around in an irreversible coma for years, a constant source of stress and sadness to your family and friends.  With a Living Will you can be sure that your desires about what medical care you wish to receive or avoid are followed.  

VIEW SAMPLE DIRECTIVE TO PHYSICIANS (LIVING WILL)

Probate

When a person dies, someone must step in to wind up the deceased person's affairs.  Bills must be paid, property must be accounted for, and items must be passed on to the appropriate people.  All of these matters are addressed during the probate process. 

Click Here for Information Regarding Probate